dimanche 28 mars 2010

Tuberose Tsunami


My tuberose addiction sometimes has me wondering whether part of me isn’t still stuck in the tuberose-heavy 80s (though at the time I wore only Habanita). Either that, or I picked up the habit in childhood when my mom rubbed me with the quintessentially Canadian analgesic cream Antiphlogistin, which contains a whopping 18% of methyl salicylate, that minty-camphoraceous top note that comes off in tuberose absolute, the one showcased in Tubéreuse Criminelle

Whatever the reason – and my money is on a bid to entice the American market, which has always historically adore the note – it seems that tuberose is the thing this spring. After Histoires de Parfums’ Trilogy, and Prada’s Infusion de Tubéreuse (which I haven’t yet smelled – I intend to do so shortly), Honoré des Prés is about to launch Vamp à NY in late April: a tuberose, rhum and balsam potion composed by Olivia Giacobetti. Honoré des Prés’ all-organic premise is neither here nor there for me, but I’ll throw myself on anything Giacobetti puts out, which hasn’t been that much recently. A sample is coming my way as we speak.

And then, of course, there is L’Artisan Parfumeur’s Nuit de Tubéreuse, a scent I’ve been wearing since last December (I was given a decant of the test batch) and was asked not to speak of until we got closer to launch time, now slated for May 15, which happens to be the feast of saint Denise though I swear I had nothing to do with that. Now that L’Artisan have outed the scent on their blog and presented it at the Exsence fair in Milan, I’ll be posting my review soon, along with a Grain de Musc exclusive.

So watch this space for tuberose heaven…

25 commentaires:

  1. Exciting, Denyse. I'm a sucker for tuberose as well, although it's usually set in such a voluptuous context that it's not something I can easily wear in public. I look forward to your reviews.

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  2. Ah...a tease...and then a wait. I see that we play a game...okay, L'Artisan tuberose...alright, Denyse...I wait...

    ;)

    Indeed, what *is* with tuberose? Is it IFRA safe, and therefore an open target? (I don't know; I actually posit that question rather seriously. Though I know flavor of the moment can often just be a zeitgeist.)

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  3. Jarvis, I'm convinced a man could easily wear the Nuit de Tubéreuse, as it's a very different treatment. I'm trying to sit on the review as long as I can because it *is* very far ahead still of the launch, and I've just done a Duchaufour piece... But I'm squirming!

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  4. All tubey, all the time! Perfectly fine with me! I wore Carnal Flower yesterday and it was good for my soul.

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  5. ScentScelf, see what I've just answered Jarvis...
    I don't think the tuberose craze has anything to do with IFRA (lots of things don't, thank God). As I've written, I think it's got more to do with courting the American market, which apparently is the classic reason for doing tuberose.

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  6. Amy, it's all right by me too. I'm quite curious to smell the Giacobetti now. Can't wrap my head yet around tuberose, rum and balsams!

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  7. I absolutely adore tuberose in all its incarnations :) The thing is, this new "tsunami" is somewhat baffling to me - tuberose scents are supposedly the ones with a lot of character, and I must confess I know very few people who can pull off Fracas. Are we looking at a wave of watered-down tuberose perfumes? (I have a sneaking suspicion the Prada one won't be much in the sillage department.) Anyway, I'm looking forward to your review of L'Artisan's tuberose!

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  8. Fashionistaag, the Histoires de Parfums are far from watered-down (though being niche, they don't have to toe the market line as much). I've only smelled the Prada on another person, in such a scent-laden atmosphere I'd have had to get much closer to her than our recent acquaintance allowed to get a proper snootfull.
    As for the L'Artisan, it is also very distinctive, but it's not a sillage monster.

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  9. Oh D, I love hearing you say that a man can pull it off.

    But whether you give endorsement or not, tuberose is what I love smelling like!

    Can't wait for your review of L'Artisan's review of the Nuit...

    Marcus

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  10. Marcus, saying it, thinking it too... Have a whiff of methyl salicylate pomade to help that wait along...

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  11. Bring it on!

    :-)

    (And, looking at my crammed April calendar, May doesn't seem that far away...)

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  12. Alyssa, it'll go by at a scary pace...

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  13. Oh wow, I can't wait to try both the L' Artisan and the new Giacobetti! I am also a tuberose "addict" and I have no intention of stopping! :-)

    I look forward to your review of both of them, but I know they will make me want them even more than I already do!

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  14. Flora, I hope to get the Honoré des Prés this week. I'm impatient too...

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  15. Denyse, I've been looking forward to trying the Duchaufour since you first mentioned it MONTHS ago (before it was even revealed to be tuberose). I've been enjoying a sample of Killian's Beyond Love very much recently, so I'm very curious as to compare this with the Duchaufour before too long, and very much looking forward to your review. It MUST be good if you've been wearing it! Thanks, nozknoz

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  16. Oh how fascinating- I had no idea I was living in a tuberose culture! If America apparently loves tuberoses, then what do the French love?

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  17. tuberose is my obsession. I've been tracking down anything and everything with that intoxicating note for 17 years I think....ok, maybe 14 but still. I can not wait for the new L'artisan. I love the three Histoire de Parfums trilogy, which I bought unsniffed...wow, perhaps I have a problem.
    Thank you for posting, I am a huge fan.

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  18. Nozknoz, they're extremely different. The By Kilian is much closer to the flower itself, while the AP exploits the characteristics of the absolute.

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  19. Jared, I'm not quite sure that there are "let's do this to please the French market" notes... There must be. But nothing springs to mind.

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  20. Bryan, I *know* your tuberose obsession! And clearly, judging from these comments, you're not alone...

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  21. I will be watching! v interested in the new ones- though Fracas is still the grand dame

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  22. Rose, I haven't worn Fracas for a long while -- in fact, well, ever since I broke my vintage bottle. Germaine Cellier must've been trying to tell me something. It might have been: "You're a Bandit woman".

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  23. Bandit woman indeed.

    Marcus

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  24. I look forward to testing Nuit de Tubereuse, but the name makes me laugh-- it sounds so like a 50's-era monster movie. "Night of the Tuberose". . .
    Gretchen

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  25. Gretchen, you're right at that! It *does* sound that way in English. Though translated properly, it would probably be more like "Tuberose Night".

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